How to Reset Hosts File | XP | Vista | Windows 7

How to Reset Hosts File | XP | Vista | Windows 7

This article describes how to re-set the hosts files for Windows XP, windows vista and Windows 7. Please note a tool has been created from Microsoft to automatically do this for you. We recommend you just use the auto tool in most cases.

To reset the hosts file back to the default, follow these steps:

1. Click Start, click Run, type %systemroot% system32driversetc, and then click OK. You can also open up the My Computer Icon and browse to the location. Note If you are using 64 bit version of Windows, type %systemroot% SysWOW64driversetc.

2. Rename the hosts file to hosts.bak.  To re-name the file you right click on it ans select rename.  You can also just change the file to hostsOLD or something like that.

3. Create the new default hosts file.

To do this, follow these steps:

1. Right-click an open space in the %WinDir%system32driversetc folder, point to New, click Text Document, type hosts, and then press ENTER.

2. Click Yes to confirm that the file name extension will not be txt.

3. Open the new created hosts file in a text editor, for example, in the Notepad. 4. Copy the following text to the file. Keep in minde that everything that follows the  # symbol is null and it does not really matter:

For Windows XP

This is a sample HOSTS file used by Microsoft TCP/IP for Windows.

This file contains the mappings of IP addresses to host names. Each entry should be kept on an individual line. The IP address should # be placed in the first column followed by the corresponding host name. The IP address and the host name should be separated by at least one # space.

Additionally, comments (such as these) may be inserted on individual # lines or following the machine name denoted by a symbol. For example:

102.54.94.97 rhino.acme.com # source server # 38.25.63.10 x.acme.com # x client host 127.0.0.1 localhost

For Windows Vista

This is a sample HOSTS file used by Microsoft TCP/IP for Windows.

# # This file contains the mappings of IP addresses to host names. Each # entry should be kept on an individual line. The IP address should # be placed in the first column followed by the corresponding host name. # The IP address and the host name should be separated by at least one # space. # # Additionally, comments (such as these) may be inserted on individual # lines or following the machine name denoted by a ‘#’ symbol. # # For example: # # 102.54.94.97 rhino.acme.com # source server # 38.25.63.10 x.acme.com # x client host 127.0.0.1 localhost ::1 localhost

For Windows 7

# Copyright (c) 1993-2006 Microsoft Corp. #

# This is a sample HOSTS file used by Microsoft TCP/IP for Windows. #

# This file contains the mappings of IP addresses to host names. Each

# entry should be kept on an individual line. The IP address should

# be placed in the first column followed by the corresponding host name.

# The IP address and the host name should be separated by at least one # space. #

# Additionally, comments (such as these) may be inserted on individual

# lines or following the machine name denoted by a ‘#’ symbol. #

# For example: # # 102.54.94.97 rhino.acme.com # source server # 38.25.63.10 x.acme.com # x client host

# localhost name resolution is handle within DNS itself.

# 127.0.0.1 localhost

# ::1 localhost 5. Save and close the file.

Microsoft Security Essentials

Microsoft Security Essentials

Microsoft Security Essentials, which was initially known as Morro, is a free antivirus application provided by Microsoft for its operating systems Windows XP, Windows Vista and Windows 7. It was built to replace the previous antivirus software created by Microsoft, Windows Live OneCare, which required payment. As Microsoft Security Essentials is offered for free, it has an extensive user base. It is also lightweight and speedy, which makes it very useful. As it offers tight integration with the Windows environment, it disables Windows Defender, and provides much more extensive protection from malware, spyware, viruses and rootkits.

 

http://windows.microsoft.com/en-US/windows/products/security-essentials

MICROSOFT NOT SUPPORTING XP?

MICROSOFT NOT SUPPORTING XP?

If you have Windows XP, you may have received a notification that Microsoft will no longer support it. You probably wonder what that means. First, it doesn’t mean that your computer will shut down and no longer function. It just means that you will no longer receive updates from Microsoft that protect you from viruses, and you will not be able to use many new programs written for your computer.

If we still had a computer with Windows XP on it, we would recommend upgrading at this point. First, you want to be protected from Viruses and all the antivirus programs are written for computers from today. So if you try to install anti-virus on your computer, your system will run so slow it will be almost unusable. Second, when new programs are written they probably won’t support windows XP and you don’t want to buy something that you need that night and realize you also need a new computer. It’s always best to upgrade when you’re not in a rush to get something completed. And it’s also a good time to do it when your old computer still works. Some people wait till their computer no longer functions to upgrade. Then they have an old obscure program they want us to make work and we cant access the old computer to see what was going on.

So our advice is, if you have the money go ahead and have us do the upgrade for you. That way we can hold your hand through the process and make things easier for you.